Energy, Emissions And Elevation: 6 Quick Climate Facts | Open Data

So they can get out of debt faster, save for their childrenas education, invest more each month, catch up on retirement savings, buy their dream home, take a long-overdue vacation or just to help make ends meet. How much they choose to make is up to them. Many just want to supplement their current income. Others choose to put in more effort and create a new, lucrative career.

The GHG breakdown is much different in low income countries, where energy use is a smaller share of the the economy and agriculture a much larger share. In low income countries, methane accounts for 52% of emissions, while CO2 and nitrous oxide account for about 24% each. Over comments on the elevation group 450 million people live in areas where the elevation is 5 meters or less For decision makers concerned about sea level rise, this is a significant concern. Sea levels have been rising at over 3mm per year , which over a few decades will significantly impact populations in low lying areas, and areas vulnerable to typhoons and hurricanes. CIESIN estimates that 7% of the world population in 2000 lived in areas where the elevation is 5 meters or less.

But as a percentage oftotalelectricity production, renewables are still a small share: just 3.6% globally in 2010. Methane, not CO2 is the dominant greenhouse gas in low income countries Besides CO2, methane, nitrous oxide and several other industrial gases contribute to the greenhouse effect. Methane and nitrous oxide, arising mainly from agriculture, have more global warming potency per ton than CO2. But even weighting for potency, CO2 counts for about 75% of global greenhouse gases (not counting CO2 from land use change and deforestation). The GHG breakdown is much different in low income countries, where energy use is a smaller share of the the economy and agriculture a much larger share.

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